Lund Oil, Inc.

Diesel 

often referred to as diesel fuel, is a type of fuel derived from crude oil. It is specifically designed for use in diesel engines, which are different from gasoline engines in how they ignite the fuel. Here is a more detailed breakdown 

 

Composition: Diesel is made up of hydrocarbons, primarily in the C12 to C20 range. It is produced by the fractional distillation of crude oil, a process that separates the different components of the oil based on their boiling points. 

Properties: Diesel has a higher energy density than gasoline, meaning it can provide more energy per unit volume. It is less volatile and has a higher boiling point than gasoline. 

Usage in Engines: Diesel engines are different from gasoline engines in that they use compression ignition rather than spark ignition. In a diesel engine, air is compressed to a high degree, heating it up, and then diesel is injected into the combustion chamber. The high temperature of the air ignites the diesel fuel without the need for a spark plug. 

Efficiency and Emissions: Diesel engines are often more fuel-efficient than gasoline engines, especially under load or during heavy-duty use. However, they can produce higher levels of certain pollutants, like nitrogen oxides and particulates, leading to stricter emission regulations in many countries. 

Applications: Diesel is widely used in heavy-duty vehicles such as trucks, buses, and tractors. It is also common in many industrial applications, marine vessels, and some passenger vehicles, particularly in Europe. 

Environmental Impact: Concerns about air quality and climate change have led to the development of cleaner diesel technologies and alternatives, including biodiesel and synthetic diesel, which aim to reduce harmful emissions. 

 

Regular Diesel (Diesel #2 ULSD): 

   – Most Common Form: Diesel #2 is the most commonly used diesel fuel. It is what you typically find at fuel stations. 

    – Low Sulfur Content: As the name suggests, ULSD has a significantly lower sulfur content compared to traditional diesel. 

   – Properties: This variety has a good balance between volatility and energy content, making it suitable for a wide range of temperatures. 

   – Environmental Impact: Lower sulfur levels lead to fewer emissions of sulfur oxides, which are harmful to the environment. 

   – Usage: Used in most diesel-engine vehicles, like trucks, buses, and some cars. 

 

Winter Diesel (Diesel #1 ULSD): 

   – Cold Weather Use: Diesel #1, or winter diesel, has a lower viscosity and gels at a lower temperature than Diesel #2.  

   – Low Sulfur Content: As the name suggests, ULSD has a significantly lower sulfur content compared to traditional diesel. 

   – Properties: It is more volatile and has a lower energy content, but its ability to remain fluid at lower temperatures makes it useful in cold climates. 

  – Environmental Impact: Lower sulfur levels lead to fewer emissions of sulfur oxides, which are harmful to the environment. 

   – Usage: Often blended with Diesel #2 in colder months to prevent fuel gelling. 

 

Biodiesel: 

   – Renewable Source: Biodiesel is made from vegetable oils, animal fats, or recycled restaurant greases. It is renewable and can be used as a pure fuel or blended with Petro diesel. 

   – Eco-Friendly: It reduces dependence on fossil fuels and emits fewer pollutants. 

   – Compatibility: Modern diesel engines can generally use biodiesel without modification, but high concentrations (above B20 – a blend of 20% biodiesel and 80% Petro diesel) may require engine modifications. 

Each type of diesel is formulated to meet specific needs, like operating in cold weather, reducing emissions, or being more environmentally friendly. The choice of diesel depends on factors such as engine type, climate, environmental regulations, and intended use.